De Blasio’s Affordable Housing Plan Heads to an Uncertain City Council

The Mayor's plan calls for creating or preserving 200,000 units of affordable housing over the next ten years.
The Mayor's plan calls for creating or preserving 200,000 units of affordable housing over the next ten years.


If it isn’t already apparent how difficult it will be to please every community in a controversial citywide re-zoning effort, it probably will be once the City Council gets its hands on Mayor Bill de Blasio’s affordable housing plan tomorrow.

“I think because we’re such a diverse city, we’re finding out that basically there’s something in this plan for everyone not to like,” Councilman James Vacca, a Bronx Democrat, quipped to the Observer.

That about sets the scene for the council’s hearings, which begin today, on Mr. de Blasio’s two citywide zoning amendments, Mandatory Inclusionary Housing and Zoning for Quality and Affordability—pillars of his effort to save or create 200,000 units of affordable housing over 12 years. Those hearings, before the Subcommittee on Zoning and Franchises, kick of the tumultuous and final leg of the process for Mr. de Blasio’s plan: approval by the City Council.

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