World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!

Slide 1: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 2: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 3: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 4: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 5: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 6: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 7: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 8: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 9: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 10: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 11: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 12: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 13: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 14: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!
Slide 15: World Trade Center Construction: The December 2009 Photo Tour!

Previous 0/15 Next

There’s a whole lot of steel work going on now at the Freedom Tower. The center of it is a very thick concrete core (reinforced with steel rebar), and the exterior and floors are all steel beams.

 

Brian Letwin

Setting the beams into place isn’t for the faint of heart. As a crane lowers the beams, workers, in harnesses, guide the steel down as they stand on small beams and cables.

 

Brian Letwin

Another worker, with 7 World Trade Center in the background, puts steel into place.

 

Brian Letwin

A worker on the south face of the Freedom Tower.

Brian Letwin

Two enormous tower cranes rise in the middle of the building (this is the southern crane). The cranes lift steel around them to fill out the skeleton. Once the steel is high enough, the cranes jump four stories or so, and the process repeats.

 

Brian Letwin

Here’s the really tall lobby. At the back (with all the red scaffolding) is the concrete core, which surrounds the guts of the building, such as the stairs and elevators. In all the planned World Trade Center towers (and Larry Silverstein’s 7 World Trade Center, completed in 2006), the concrete cores are very thick–the Freedom Tower’s looks to be about three feet–acting as a strong, stable central support.

 

Brian Letwin

We then went down to the Memorial plaza. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum takes up 8 acres on the site, with two giant waterfalls planned as the centerpieces that were nearly the size of the Twin Tower footprints. Here’s the base of the waterfall (and here’s a rendering of what it should look like)

 

Brian Letwin

Here’s a look at edge of the plaza, which is at street level, overlooking a waterfall (on the other side of the fencing).

Brian Letwin

And here’s the cavernous space below the plaza, some of which will be the giant museum and other parts of which will be mechanical equipment. 

 

Brian Letwin

Known simply as the “1-Box,” this less-than-sightly stripe running horizontally through the photo is the tube that holds the No. 1 subway line. In an extraordinarily expensive effort–think nine figures–the box has been propped up by stilts as it runs north-south through the site as construction goes on around it. Cutting off the 1-train at Chambers Street while the site was built out over years would have saved money, though apparently would have had a highly disruptive effect on other subway lines.

Brian Letwin

The PATH train runs through the site as well, further complicating matters.

Brian Letwin

Here’s developer Larry Silverstein’s World Trade Center Tower 4. There’s now steel rising above street level, though Mr. Silverstein has said he would have to soon stop construction without a resolution over how his towers will be financed (he’s currently in arbitration with the Port Authority). He has not begun noticeable work on Tower 3 (the bare site on the left).

Brian Letwin

More pits on the other half of the “eastern bathtub.” The Santiago Calatrava-designed PATH station is slated to go where all the bulldozers are, and the Norman Foster-designed Tower 2 is slated to go further back.

Brian Letwin

Goldman Sachs’ new building, just behind all the cranes, has begun move-ins, while Larry Silverstein’s 7 World Trade Center, right, has been open for three years.

 

Brian Letwin