Lease Beat

Catholic Charities to Consolidate at 80 Maiden Lane

Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York has signed a 25,000-square-foot lease at 80 Maiden Lane in the Financial District, where it will bring together three of its community service organizations, sources tell The Commercial Observer.

The organization, which runs various community outreach programs and has also been instrumental in helping those impacted and displaced by Hurricane Sandy, took the 13th floor and part of 14th floor in the building.

“We’re very excited about seeing all those services come together in the same location,” said Joseph Buttigieg, associate executive director at Catholic Charities.

80 Maiden Lane

80 Maiden Lane

The three divisions of the organization – one dedicated to teaching English as a second language (ESL), and the others serving immigration and refugee needs, respectively – will vacate the roughly 15,000-square-foot 12th floor at Catholic Charities’ 1011 First Avenue offices.

The organization will retain the office space at 1011 First Avenue, though it hasn’t been determined what it will be used for.

The new space will be renovated to meet the needs of the three programs, in a location whose multiple subway lines offer more convenience to visitors coming from across the city who seek the organization’s services, Mr. Buttigieg said.

“We have a 150 people coming in for intake and ESL throughout the day and this building was welcoming of clients coming in and out all day,” he said.

In all the space will feature five conference rooms, a computer lab and various workstations, including spaces designed as conversation areas for ESL students to meet with volunteers.

The New International Center, which runs the free ESL instruction, has moved into temporary space on the 14th floor as the renovations take place on the 13th.  Once complete, they will move down to floor 13 as floor 14 is renovated.

Mark Weiss, a vice chairman at Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, represented the tenant with Greg Wang.  The brokers declined comment.

Landlords Paul Wasserman and Nathan Wasserman did not return calls seeking comment in time for publication.

The 26-story, 315-foot building was built in 1912.

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